Gamification in the 5th Grade Classroom: The Conclusion

 

If you haven’t been following along with my series on gamification in the 5th grade classroom, you’ve been missing out. This year, Rachel Cheafsky and I have worked hard to implement a version of my gamification system that meets the needs of her classroom: one where she did not have ready access to a lot of technology. Rachel had a great year and agreed to come back and tell us how things wrapped up. Check it out:


The 2016-2017 school year has officially come to a close, which, for me, means I have officially cleared my first level as a first time teacher in a fully gamified classroom.  It was my eighth year in the classroom and it completely shifted my mindset. Here’s why:

After seeing Chris Aviles present on gamification about a year and a half ago, I knew I had to take all his great ideas and find a way to use them in my own 5th grade classroom.  This past September, I did just that. I started by setting up my own website. This alone was a game changer.  In one place, I was able to put all of my contact information, resources, social media, and links for students that was updated and utilized throughout the year.  My website also housed all the main components attached to the gamification system I had in place.  The class and team leaderboards, Item Shop, and achievements were all also located within my website.

Before I can continue, though, I need to give you a little background information on how I used gamification within my 5th grade classroom. The students had the opportunity to earn Experience Points (XP) and Achievement Points (AP) all throughout the school year.  XP was earned through their graded assignments and AP was earned when students completed heroic deeds or displayed heroic traits. For example, one way to earn AP was by completing your Side Quest (our cool name for homework). There are a lot of ways to earn AP and some new ideas were added as the year progressed. Here are some of my favorites:

Student Achievements were kept in baseball card holders and hung from their chairs!

Tribute: This achievement card was earned if the student selected for Tribute, by a random name generator, was prepared with the item I asked for.  For example, if we were using composition books that day, I would randomly select a students name and if they had the item, they earned 10 AP for everyone in the class.

Side Quest: The students earned this card for completing their side quest (homework). If everyone completed their side quest, the whole class earned 50 AP. Students worked hard to not let their peers down. I definitely saw an increase in how often they did homework.

The Chosen One: This card was earned by the student whose homework we used to go over the side quest as a class.  It was selected by a random generator and they could either decide to be the chosen one or pass it on to the next person.

That Insta-Life: This achievement was definitely a crowd pleaser!  I started my very own class Instagram account this year and highlighted students throughout the year.  If they made it onto the Instagram for being awesome, they received this achievement card along with 25 AP!

Task Master:  This card was created half-way through the year by the students themselves! One day, my class was all on task working so well.  The volume was appropriate and everyone was doing what they needed to.  I complimented the class and praised them on their behavior.  One student said, “This should be an achievement,” and right there on the spot it was unlocked, Task Master!  A chart was kept on the board each day as well as two sticky notes were placed under each period.  At the end of each class I would reveal the name of the student and if that student was on task for the period, they earned two tally marks for the class in a class vs. class competition. At the end of the week, the class with the most tally marks won Task Master for the week along with 50ap. Talk about accountability! Now the students who had difficulty staying on task were trying harder because they wanted to earn Task Master and they definitely did not want to let their peers down.

All of the students were given a baseball card holder and this is what they used to house all of the cards they earned from their achievement points.  They loved being able to see the tangible cards they were earning and collecting on a daily basis.  I kept totals on their XP and AP points and updated the leader boards every 2 weeks.  The leaderboards were a hit, as the students were able to create learner tags and check out their progress vs the rest of the students in both classes whenever they liked!

Another game changer was just changing the names of everyday classroom items.  For example, homework is now called a Side Quest.  Quizzes are much better when you call them Heroic Quests and Tests now are known as Epic Quests.  Changing the names of these regular assignments changed the way the students thought about them and motivated them to complete them and do better.

I think my favorite thing about gamifying my classroom was that it was always able to be changed or improved upon.  When a student did something amazing, I could recognize this achievement by making it an official achievement in our class.  For example, in 5th grade the students at my school get lockers for the first time.  It is very difficult for them to unlock the combination lockers.  This can take weeks of practice.  The first time one of my students did it on their own, I immediately announced that a secret achievement had been unlocked.  The excitement of a secret achievement being unlocked was like Christmas morning to my kids.  This achievement, Locker Expert, was game changing.  My classes worked harder, practiced more, and learned faster than most of the other 5th graders because they all wanted the Locker Expert card worth 200 AP!

My Task Master chart with student names hidden under the Post-Its.

Chris’ gamification system also tied in with many other systems I already had functioning within my classroom.  For example, I have a Jobs system within my room.  The students apply for classroom jobs on a monthly basis and then students are selected for hire each month.  In the past, I would pay them with fake money which they would then use in a classroom store with tangible items.  This was no more, thanks to gamification.  Now, the students were paid for the jobs in AP.  The students could use their AP at any time by shopping the item shop listed within my website.

The best part of the Item Shop was that all of the items were non-tangible which increased extrinsic motivation. The Item Shop, initially made me nervous because I was used to providing my students with tangible items as rewards.  It always seemed to me that what they wanted was stuff!  They wanted toys, food, and supplies.  Chris convinced me that they didn’t need stuff and that I could come up with a list of items that were non-tangible that would be just as sought after. Boy was he right!  I still can’t believe he was right about that!  Some of the most popular items purchased from the Item Shop are as follows:

Purge:  This was hands down the most bought item all year.  This cost was 500 AP and it stole XP points away from the other class on the class vs. class leaderboard.  Since the leaderboards were updated bi-weekly, they would see the results of the class vs. class competition and immediately begin purging so their class could take the lead.  They loved it!

Music Pass:  This was the second most bought item.  This cost 400 AP and could be used to listen to music using headphones as they worked on a class assignment on the laptops.

Forgiveness:  This was the third most bought item.  This cost 400 AP and could be used to turn in an assignment late without being penalized for a late grade.

Remember, to earn these achievements, students had to complete heroic deeds or display heroic traits. They had to be awesome to earn these awesome items.

Looking back on the year, I am very happy with all of the ways I was able to use game-mechanics in my classroom.  While I definitely utilized many of the mechanics I set out to, there are still so many that I haven’t even touched.  There are many single player and guild achievements that I had originally listed on my site that I did not keep up with this year.  I definitely plan on utilizing more achievements next year, but overall I couldn’t be happier with the way my first year ended.  The students remained excited until the very last day when the winning class was announced for the year. Their award: the first class ever to be named and listed on the all-time-leader board!

Gamification has been on of the best tools I’ve added to my teacher tool belt.  I have peaked my student’s interests in ways I never imagined all while still teaching the curriculum and managing my everyday classroom routines.  Gamifying my class has improved my classroom culture beyond my wildest dreams.

Level 2, year 2, I am ready for you!


On behalf of Rachel: Until Next Time,

GLHF

What Learning Management Systems Are Still Missing

I only have a few classes left before I wrap up my master’s degree. I’ve enjoyed Boise’s master’s degree program, but one thing I won’t miss is Blackboard. Blackboard, the ubiquitous, bland “course management system,” was used in all but one of my master’s classes. My one class that didn’t use Blackboard was a new class taught by Chris Haskell about Quest-Based Learning (QBL). The QBL class was taught totally on Slack. I appreciate Dr. Haskell pushing us onto a new platform that focused on collaboration over content management because it made me realize what’s missing in Learning Management Systems (LMSs).

What is missing from LMSs are useful, asynchronous collaboration and communication tools. No LMS has nailed this aspect of learning yet. It seems like most of these LMSs understand how important collaboration is, but have settled on the comment board being the best it can come up with. Few have communication tools. We need better.

My rekindled search for a collaboration and communication-focused LMS or similar tools that work well with an LMS has been brought on by my evolving makerspace. I’ve been looking for tools to use with my students in my blended Innovation Lab that allow them to knock down the walls of the classroom.

I need a way for students to keep each other updated, share files, and collaborate on job statuses on a day-to-day basis in a way that I’m just not getting in LMSs. Next year, as I take our Fair Haven Innovates initiative into 4th through 8th grade, I’m looking for a way to allow students to tell their peers what they have been working on and what jobs are left to do because I see students one day a week for an hour. In that hour, jobs need to be done. These jobs, such as building our Raspberry Pi weather station, often take longer than an hour. I want a way for my students on Friday to tell my students on Monday what they’ve done and what is left to do. I don’t want to wait a week to have the project resumed, nor do I want to deny other groups the ability to work on these big projects because another group has started them. I want them to be able to transfer videos, pictures, or files throughout the week to better illustrate talking points and next steps so other groups can pickup where they left off. I want to get to a place where working with students in other classrooms on big, meaningful projects is as easy as working with someone in your class sitting next to you.

Another example: In FH Grows, our 7th grade class where gardening meets the Internet of Things, I’m want a way for groups to let other groups know what they’ve done in our garden. I’m hoping the kids will be able to communicate when a watering, weeding, or harvesting last occurred and when it should be done again. To do this right now, I have to use a combination of technology or track a host of Post-It notes neither of which I want to do.

Don’t get me wrong, there are a lot of great LMSs out there. I’ve used Schoology for years, but they don’t have the collaboration tools I’m looking for. Schoology does have an app called Backchannel Chat that I really enjoy using, but it doesn’t have the communication piece I’m looking for. Google Classroom has the Stream, which can often be more of a headache than a help when it comes to collaboration. My students use Google Docs, rather than the Stream, to collaborate.

I’m looking for a jobs board like Trello, meets asynchronous communication like Slack, meets a Learning Management System. I want something designed specifically for students that helps them manage serious project-based learning assignments. My most promising piece of tech looks to be Flipgrid. Flipgrid is intended for teacher-to-student reflection and peer-to-peer responses, but I’m wondering if I can use it like a video answering machine. A group leaves a video message for another group, they respond, and the thread goes back and forth.

While I know I’ll figure out a process to let students communicate and collaborate between classes before next year, I wish better tools would be integrated into LMSs so we can have a blended learning and collaborating take place under one roof.

 

Evolving our Makerspace: 3 Lessons Learned Designing for Slack

The Slack Design Challenge continues! If you haven’t been following my last few posts, I have decided to take entrepreneurship in our makerspace, called The Innovation Lab (under construction), to the next level! In my last post, I announced that FH Gizmos, our student-run edcorp, has been hired by Slack. Since my last post, I’ve learned a lot about evolving our makerspace into the three distinct student-run businesses it will become next year.

Since I last wrote, students have made their way through our design process. We started with empathy to understand Slack’s need. Next, we moved through the define, imagine, and make stage as we produce prototypes to help solve Slack’s problem. This week, we are wrapping up our in-house testing stage. I’m mailing our best prototypes to Slack tomorrow for their feedback.

Fifth Grade Team’s Fidget Spinner

I felt confident in the design process I developed for students. It’s a process we’ve used for almost two years. Designing for Slack was different, though. My kids have never designed for a real client let alone a client across the country from them. Asynchronous communication isn’t a skill my students have used before. Obviously, we used Slack to communicate with our users at Slack and it has been fun watching them learn to communicate asynchronously and be patient while Slack gets back to them. Further, the fact that my students are accountable to real people, not their teacher, has made the learning process so much more engaging, meaningful, and authentic.

When I taught English, I always had students push their work to a larger audience because my kids always worked harder when they knew someone other than me would read their writing. I’m happy to report the same holds true for the makerspace/student-run edcorp: my students are working harder because they know they have to ship a final product to Slack by the first week of June.

Students Need To Ship it!

Ideas Ready To Ship!

The biggest lesson I’ve learned about combining entrepreneurship and the makerspace actually took me six months to figure out. Even before FH Gizmos started working with Slack, the co-founder of Real World ScholarsJohn Cahalin, and I have been discussing the difficulties we’ve found in moving kids from thoughts to action; taking kids from design thinking to design doing. Choice paralysis and fear of failure is something I see a lot from students and even adults. Some people would rather do nothing than do something wrong. You can’t blame them. For years, schools have punished kids for making mistakes even though we know that’s how learning happens. If you’ve ever run a business or created something, you know that their isn’t always a clear path to the right choice. Mistakes happen. Often, you have to take your best guess, see it through, and iterate on what you learn when you fail, then do it all over again.

Whether it is the due date, the real client, or having a manufacturer waiting to turn students’ ideas into real, sellable products, I have been teaching with a sense of urgency. I have been getting on my kids to make decisions, fail quickly, and bang out another prototype. I have been saying things like, “done is better than perfect.” I’ve been telling kids that their prototypes are going to fail and that’s ok because I want them to test their way to the right answer. Hurry up and build the plane while it’s flying.

John from RWS called me last week. As we got into another brainstorming session about moving student thoughts to action, John taught me about the concept of Shipping and asked me what that would look like in the classroom.

The concept of Shipping was new to me, but good teachers wanting student learning to be authentic isn’t new. We want our kids to learn the things they’ll need to be successful through real-world experiences. To do that, we have put students at the center of the class and help kids summon the courage to turn thoughts and ideas into actions that they are then brave enough to share with people outside the walls of the classroom. In my program, I need to help my kids Ship! Shipping means every time a kid takes a thought, idea, prototype, product, elevator pitch – anything – out the classroom door and into the real world, they are shipping it! The urgency that I am using to move students toward action can best be summoned up by the Ship It mentality. Helping my students Ship needs to be a focus in my program going forward because it’s never been more important to reframe failure as iteration.

Grouping Students By Perceived Talents Works

We used a Google Form to survey students on their perceived talents. Students were asked which talent – creative, logical, outgoing, and technical – was most to least like them. Instead of randomly assigning groups for the Slack project, we took these student responses and made groups that had a student that was strong in each one of these talents. We also made sure that groups had an even mix of boys and girls.
Overall, this experiment was a success. Each group member was promoted to team leader when they reached the design stage that best matched their perceived talents. Some students struggled to work with members of the other gender at times, but, overall, having different voices and talents represented in each group made a positive impact on the quality of work. Next year, I’ll refine and reuse this method to make predetermined business teams based on a student’s perceived talents. I hope this method helps foster leadership skills, stretch talents, and grow an appreciation for diversity in group dynamics.

 

Waste Can Be Combated

For the Slack Design Challenge, we wanted students to prototype quickly using the simplest, cheapest supplies possible. This meant a trip to the dollar store! I kept careful track of supplies and how they were used because waste is expensive for makerspaces and a valuable lesson to teach young entrepreneurs.

Scout and Sketch in action

After our four week make/test design loop, I figured out that it cost about a $1.05 per student in prototyping supplies. Meaning, I see 225 students in The Innovation Lab. I needed to buy around $230 in supplies for prototyping. Hot glue, tape, popsicle sticks, rubber bands, and cardboard were definitely the most popular supplies. Most of the other stuff I bought went unused.

The first week of the make/test stage of our Slack Design Challenge was a real eye-opener. Students went through supplies at an alarming rate! A lot of supplies were wasted and trashed at the end of class. To combat this, I added the Scout and Sketch step to the Make Stage. During Scout and Sketch, students were not allowed to take supplies. Students were asked to scout out what materials were available to them to build with, sketch how they were going to use these materials in their prototyping, and list what these materials represented in a final product. Meaning, if students used rubber bands in a prototype, they had to explain what the rubber bands would become in the final product. Pausing for thoughtfulness dropped cost per student significantly. I think I can get cost down even more by improving thoughtfulness and buying the supplies I know they’ll use. I also had our custodians bring in any cardboard boxes the school got. Free cardboard is best cardboard.

In my next couple posts, I’ll let you know how the manufacturing and final delivery to Slack goes.

Until Next Time,

Ship It!

P.S. – I want to make a jobs board similar to Favro or Trello for my classes. I don’t know what that looks like. Thoughts?

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